Building Child Safe Communities

Catholic Education Diocese of Parramatta (CEDP) is committed to keeping children safe at all our schools, Catholic Out of Schools Hours Care, Catholic Early Learning Centres and Trade Training Centres.


With this in mind, we recently released our Safeguarding Commitment Statement. Safeguarding is a framework for protecting children against harm, abuse and neglect. While Safeguarding incorporates some child protection practices, it is broader and has a more proactive approach to protecting children.

We’re so proud of the students, staff and families who were part of this powerful video about our shared commitment to keeping children and young people safe.

Please take a moment to view our Safeguarding Commitment Statement below

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact your school directly or email safeguarding@parra.catholic.edu.au.


 

 

 

 

We adhere to the National Catholic Safeguarding Standards and support the National Principles for Child Safe Organisations.

A range of checks and undertakings are required for people who work for or provide services to CEDP. These checks reduce potential risk and forms part of our strategy to build child safe communities.

In the Diocese of Parramatta we see parents as partners in your child's educational experience. Parents are encouraged to become involved in our schools in a variety of ways such as canteen helpers, coaches of sporting teams, supporting classroom learning, providing general assistance around the school and much much more.

Contractors may include architects, builders and tradespeople project managed by CEDP or services provided to students using CEDP rooms and equipment including music teachers, speech pathologists, canteen providers and repairs and maintenance workers, amongst others.

We thank you for the important role you play in supporting the ongoing learning of our students and the opportunities you provide.

 

 

 


All Volunteers and Contractors must complete the Building Child Safe Communities Undertaking Form and online training module prior to being engaged by a school or any other CEDP site.


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How does CEDP meet the 10 safeguarding standards?


Set out below are each of the 10 NCSS including their criteria and information on how CEDP are meeting these requirements.

This information is constantly evolving and you are invited to contact Safeguarding to discuss how your school meets the standards and any additional programs that may exist at a local level which support their implementation.

National Catholic Safeguarding Standards

Child safeguarding is embedded in the entity’s leadership, governance and culture


Indicators

  • 1.1 The entity publicly commits to child safeguarding and takes a zero-tolerance approach to child abuse
  • 1.2 A child safeguarding culture is championed and modelled at all levels of the entity from the top down and bottom up
  • 1.3 Governance arrangements facilitate implementation of a Child Safeguarding Policy across the entity’s activities
  • 1.4 A Code of Conduct provides guidelines for personnel on expected behavioral standards and responsibilities
  • 1.5 The entity has risk management strategies focusing on preventing, identifying and mitigating risks to children
  • 1.6 Personnel understand their obligations on information sharing and record keeping.

How CEDP is meeting these requirements

  • In 2019, CEDP localised a Safeguarding Team with dedicated Safeguarding Specialists who support the implementation of the National Catholic Safeguarding Standards
  • CEDP Policies and procedures include: Safeguarding Procedures, Code of Conduct, Code of Conduct when Working with Children and Students, Working with Children Check Policy, Responsible Use of ICT and Social Media for Students, Responsible Use of ICT for Staff and Child Protection Facilities Guidelines
  • CEDP has a child friendly Safeguarding Commitment Statement which is available to everyone via CEDP's website and staff Intranet (OSCAR)
  • A Safeguarding Organisation Chart is available, which show lines of authority and reporting. This is attached to the CEDP Safeguarding Procedures
  • Safeguarding has become a regular agenda item on executive leadership meetings with regular briefings provided. Safeguarding is also reported weekly to the Director Enterprise via Head People and Culture
  • Child Safeguarding is promoted regularly through Learning Exchange resources
  • Video Conferencing Guidelines have been made available for staff and students
  • Mandatory Safeguarding training is completed by staff on an annual basis and must be completed on induction by new employees
  • Safeguarding of children and students is considered in all Risk Assessments for school excursions
  • CEDP's Safeguarding Risk Management programs, including CEDP's Risk Register include strategies that focus on preventing, identifying and mitigating risks to children
  • Information Sharing Guidelines have been developed in addition to strict record keeping process for Safeguarding information
  • The development of a CEDP Risk Management Plan which focuses on preventing, identifying and mitigating risks to children
  • Design, development and implementation of the Safeguarding Case Management System which supports CEDP's obligations for record keeping.

How schools meet these requirements

In addition to the above, CEDP schools meet the Standards utilising local programs and initiatives. These may include the following:

  • utilising the Video Conferencing Guidelines for teachers
  • safeguarding is encouraged at school meetings and staff briefings
  • a postcard has been printed in all secondary student diaries to promote Safeguarding
  • a safeguarding post is put in the school newsletter each term
  • schools are required to complete mandatory compliance programs including, 24/7, Facilities and WHS audits to ensure the safety of students.

Children are informed about their rights, participate in decisions affecting them and are taken seriously


Indicators

  • 2.1 Children are informed about their rights, including safety, information and participation
  • 2.2 The importance of friendships is recognised and support from peers is encouraged, helping children feel safe and less isolated
  • 2.3 Where relevant to the setting or context, children and families may be offered access to abuse prevention programs and related information that is age appropriate
  • 2.4 Personnel are attuned to signs of harm an facilitate child-friendly ways for children to express their views, participate in decision-making and raise their concerns.

How CEDP is meeting these requirements

  • CEDP uses student surveys (Tell them from Me Survey) which are tailored for both primary and secondary students. The surveys allow the students' voices to be heard and the data collected from this engagement is analysed at both a school and system level
  • Video conferencing guidelines are available for students
  • CEDP's Responsible Use of ICT and Social Media for Students
  • Providing students with access to school counsellors
  • The implementation of the PDHPE curriculum, syllabus and resources which incorporates education units in respect to protective behaviours for children and students
  • Safe contact cards are provided through the Student Services Team
  • Student Wellbeing and Pastoral Care programs are provided to students at a school level
  • Evangelisation days and religious education programs incorporating elements of positive relationships for children and students are promoted
  • Anti-bullying policies and procedures are implemented in schools, which contain relevant and clear information relating to the management aspects of child safety
  • Mandatory safeguarding training is completed on an annual basis for: Safeguarding (Reportable Conduct) and ROSH Online
  • The Personal Development, Health and Physical Education K-10 Syllabus
  • The curriculum for Religious Education.

How schools meet these requirements

In addition to the above, CEDP schools meet the Standards utilising local programs and initiatives. These may include the following:

  • schools hold sessions with students and parents around cyber-safety (where often police are guest speakers)
  • CEDP's learning hub provides information and resources to students and parents/carers on e-safety
  • schools promote and coordinate student leadership programs that provide students with a voice
  • students are encouraged to participate in the creation of materials and programs relevant to them and their peers
  • schools regularly talk to children and arrange education programs about their right to feel safe and who to speak to if something is worrying them
  • schools work with the Student Representative Council (SRC) to find ways to ensure that the school is a safe place for students.

Families, carers and communities are informed and involved in promoting child safeguarding


Indicators

  • 3.1 Families and carers participate in decisions affecting their child
  • 3.2 The entity engages and openly communicates with families, carers and communities about its child safeguarding approach, and relevant information is accessible
  • 3.3 Families, carers and communities have a say in the entity's policies and practices
  • 3.4 Families, carers and communities are informed about the entity's operations and governance
  • 3.5 The entity takes a leadership role in raising community awareness of the dignity and rights of all children.

How CEDP is meeting these requirements

  • E-safety webinars for parents/carers are run throughout the school-year for primary and adolescent aged children. Communication (including online safety education) is provided to families via newsletters and through the local parishes.
  • Building Child Safe Communities outlines the standards of behaviour and reporting requirements for parents/carers/families as volunteers in our schools. This includes incursions/excursions and volunteering at school carnivals.
  • Building Child Safe Communities external web pages
  • Video Conferencing Guidelines for Parents outlines a parent's role in monitoring online lessons for their child
  • Providing forums for engaging with clergy and members of congregations and religious including; Parish Priests, religious brothers and sisters
  • Promoting various resources for parents/carers in the community which supports a child safe culture
  • Offering a range of opportunities for parents to engage in the services and supports provided to their children
  • Providing opportunities for parents to work in partnership with schools via various forums including information evenings and meetings that schools provide throughout each year
  • Establishing Parent Representative Councils
  • CEDP provides parents the opportunity to complete a 'Tell them from Me Survey' which includes information relating to the safety of students
  • Families are informed and made aware of the roles and responsibilities of staff via CEDP's Safeguarding Procedures and Code of Conduct When Working with Children and Students
  • Families are made aware of the entity’s Leadership Team and their Safeguarding roles and responsibilities via the safeguarding ORG chart, which is attached to the Safeguarding Procedures and available via the CEDP public website
  • Families/carers as volunteers and contractors within the community are aware of their roles and responsibilities via the BCSC Undertaking and training modules
  • CEDP has taken a pledge for the 2020 National Child Protection Week to promote the regular safeguarding of children and students
  • CEDP promotes links to Government and non-Government websites which host various safeguarding resources and information for parents and communities
  • CEDP provides links on the entity’s website to statutory child protection agencies
  • During the school-year, CEDP (in partnership with the Diocese and Parishes) hosts information sessions in partnership with e-safety commissioner on a range of relevant topics, such as e-safety, with targeted information for Primary and Secondary school age students.

How schools meet these requirements

In addition to the above, CEDP schools meet the Standards utilising local programs and initiatives. These may include the following:

  • schools provide parents/carers with information on upcoming organised information sessions
  • schools engage with Police Liaison Officers from relevant LAC units. Presentations and discussions in relation to child safety are organised by schools and are regularly conducted.
  • providing students and their families with access to school counsellors.
  • issuing parents with Cyberwise postcards, which contain itemised actions that parents can take to teach their children about cyber-safety. This can be found on CEDP's Learning Hub.

Equity is upheld and diverse needs respected in policy and practice


Indicators

  • 4.1 The entity actively anticipates children's diverse circumstances and backgrounds, and provides support and responds effectively to those who are vulnerable
  • 4.2 All children have access to information, support and complaints processes in ways that are culturally safe, accessible and easy to understand
  • 4.3 The entity pays particular attention to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children, children with disability, and children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, those who are unable to live at home, and children of diverse sexuality.

How CEDP is meeting these requirements

  • CEDP has in place risk assessments and personalised plans for students who are vulnerable
  • Employs a range of specialist staff to implement programs with particular emphasis to the diverse learning needs of students including but not limited to: English as an Additional Language (EAL/D) and sight and hearing impaired
  • Offers a range of wellbeing services through CEDP's Wellbeing Team
  • CEDP ensures its practices are underpinned and supported by a range of policies, procedures and guidelines which are embedded in those practices including, but not limited to:
    • National Aboriginal Education Strategy
    • Closing the Gap
    • Enrolment Additional Needs Guidelines
    • Managing Complaints Policy
    • Code of Conduct when working with children and students
    • Personalised Emergency Evacuation Plan (PEEP)
    • CEDP Guidelines for Supporting Students with Gender Dysphoria
    • Student Attendance Completion in Special Circumstances Guidelines
    • Transition and Planning for Students with Disability
    • CEDP Personalised Plans Guidelines
    • High Support Needs Guidelines
    • Diversity is the Norm: Guidelines
    • Aboriginal Education in Diocesan Catholic Schools: NSW
    • Personalised Learning Plans for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Students
    • Staff training across CEDP - Cultural Competency training for staff working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and committees - 'Crossing Cultures Hidden Histories'
  • Appoints and supports Aboriginal Community Liaison Officers (Jarara Indigenous Education Unit) within specific schools to act as a link between their community and to support the needs of students
  • Employs Sudanese support officers, leading teachers and specialist teachers who have experience and expertise working with school teams to develop their capacity to ensure personalised planning for students with disability
  • Alternate formatting specialists to format learning materials for students with vision impairment
  • Increased focus and attention on safety and additional risks in closed high support needs units. Risk assessments updated regularly and increased supervision ratios for students.
  • Implements a range of learning programs pertinent to the particular needs of students from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander backgrounds and students from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
  • Promotes and engages in NAIDOC Week
  • The Personal Development, Health and Physical Education K-10 Syllabus
  • The Religious Education curriculum.

How schools meet these requirements

In addition to the above, CEDP schools meet the Standards utilising local programs and initiatives. These may include the following:

  • schools have in place, and implement policies and procedures in relation to pastoral care, specifically, the identification of and provision of support for students with special needs. (Compliance audit number MR516 & RANGS 5.6.2)
  • ensuring the physical environment reflects a positive and welcoming approach to children from diverse circumstances, cultures and backgrounds. This is achieved by displaying posters, symbols, decorations or artwork that nurture a sense of identity.

People working with children are suitable and supported to reflect child safeguarding values in practice


Indicators

  • 5.1 Recruitment, including advertising, interview questions, referee checks and pre-employment screening, emphasises child safeguarding
  • 5.2 Relevant personnel (including all seminarians, clergy and religious) have current working with children checks or equivalent background checks
  • 5.3 Personnel receive an appropriate induction and are aware of their child safeguarding responsibilities, including reporting obligations
  • 5.4 Ongoing supervision and people management is focused on child safeguarding.

How CEDP is meeting these requirements

  • Working With Children Check (WWCC) is compulsory in every job advertisement
  • All staff must possess an active WWCC number
  • Implements, reviews and monitors rigorous recruitment and screening processes
  • Incorporates child protection screening questions and checks into the selection and recruitment process
  • Referee checks are completed using the Xref Template (Referee Questionnaire). The template has been amended to include new OCG definition of reportable conduct in one question. The template has been reviewed to ensure the questions meet standard 5 requirements.
  • A position description statement has been developed and is currently in the process of being included at the end of every position description template
  • A standard advertising statement has been developed and is currently in the process of replacing everything under “The Organisation” heading in all job templates.
  • The Building Child Safe Communities process has been implemented
  • A WWCC policy and safeguarding procedures have been developed
  • Established processes for staff in regards to renewal processes and verification processes are established with records kept. WWCC for volunteers and contractors are maintained in the Building Child Safe Communities portal. These processes include the following:
  1. the name and position of each person in child-related work
  2. their WWCC number (or equivalent) if applicable
  3. date of issue of check
  4. registration as the ‘employer’ with the OCG
  5. verification of the check by the ‘employer’ (if prescribed by regulation) before work with children begins
  6. the date of renewal of check
  7. a reminder/alert system to prompt regarding expiry/renewal dates
  8. the process for action if a check is found to be lapsed or otherwise invalid
  9. a process to seek, document and monitor exemptions under the relevant state or territory legislation where appropriate
  10. a process to inform the state or territory regulatory body of a change of status of an individual in relation to risk to children (e.g. barring offences, sustained reportable conduct findings).
  • Through renewal process/reports from payroll
  • Captured in relevant CEDP compliance programs.

How schools meet these requirements

In addition to the above, CEDP schools meet the Standards utilising local programs and initiatives. These may include the following:

  • from Compliance 247 (number MR504):
    A school must have in place and implement policies, procedures (and training) to ensure that all persons engaged in child-related work at the school, as defined by the Child Protection (Working with Children) Act 2012, have a working with children check clearance from the Office of the Children's Guardian as required. Compliance audit (MR505 & RANGS 5.6):
    A school must have in place and implement policies, procedures (and training) to ensure that evidence of working with children check clearances is maintained by the school for all persons in child-related work at the school as required under the Child Protection (Working with Children) Act 2012.

Processes for raising concerns and complaints are responsive, understood, accessible and used by children, families, carers, communities and personnel


Indicators

  • 6.1 The entity has an effective Complaints Handling Policy and procedures which clearly outline the roles and responsibilities, approaches to dealing with different types of complaints, reporting obligations and record keeping requirements
  • 6.2 The entity has a child-focused complaints handling system that is understood by children, families, carers and personnel
  • 6.3 Complaints are taken seriously, and responded to promptly and thoroughly
  • 6.4 The entity has policies and procedures in place that address reporting of concerns and complaints to relevant authorities, whether or not the law requires reporting, and cooperates with law enforcement
  • 6.5 Reporting, privacy and employment law obligations are met
  • 6.6 The Church Authority ensures mechanisms are in place to care for adult complainants
  • 6.7 The Church Authority ensures mechanisms are in place to monitor and support respondents facing allegations.

How CEDP is meeting these requirements

  • CEDP has a Complaints Handling Policy, Safeguarding Procedures and two Code of Conduct documents in place
  • Employs a Wellbeing Team including ROSH Coordinator and Behaviour and Attendance specialists to support mandatory reporting obligations
  • Employs a Safeguarding Team to respond to any complaints or allegations raised in relation to children or students
  • Established conflict of Interest Procedures:
    If an internal investigation needs to occur following an allegation and there is no police investigation, it is important that the investigator and/or decision maker does not have a conflict of interest (actual or reasonably perceived). The Safeguarding Team's Case Management System (CMS) requires declaration of conflict of interest.
  • Safeguarding CMS has a conflict of interest declaration for each matter at the time of intake/assessment
  • CEDP records and follows the reporting requirements of the Office of the Children’s Guardian (OCG), NSW Police (NSWP) and the Joint Child Protection Response Program (JCPRP) and DCJ
  • Fosters strong relationships with external agencies and proactively networks with the OCG, NSWP and JCPRP to ensure quality and regular review of CEDP policy and procedures
  • A CEDP centralised student management system holds information in connection with counselling records and other disclosures. ROSH online is also utilised for recording mandatory reports. All systems are permission based and restricted
  • CEDP has its own Assault Register
  • A CEDP case management system (CMS) has been designed and developed to record all information in relation to allegations/complaints. This is supported by a centralised email for correspondence, and restricted U-Drive access. An online intake form has also been developed to support reporting of concerns/complaints in relation to employees.

How schools meet these requirements

In addition to the above, CEDP schools meet the Standards utilising local programs and initiatives. These may include the following:

  • Compliance 247 (number MR501):
    A school must have in place and implement policies, procedures (and training) to ensure that staff who have direct contact with students are informed ANNUALLY of their legal responsibilities related to child protection, mandatory reporting and other relevant school expectations [including the exchange of information under Chapter 16A of the Children and Young Persons (Care and Protection) Act 1998].
    Compliance audit (MR506 & RANGS 5.6): A school must have in place and implement policies, procedures (and training) to ensure that all staff who are mandatory reporters under the Children and Young Persons (Care and Protection) Act 1998 are informed annually of their obligations and the process that the school has in place in relation to mandatory reporting.

Personnel are equipped with knowledge, skills and awareness to keep children safe through information, ongoing education and training


Indicators

  • 7.1 Personnel are trained and supported to effectively implement the entity’s child safeguarding policies and procedures
  • 7.2 Personnel receive training to recognise the nature and indicators of child abuse, including harmful behaviours by a child towards another child
  • 7.3 Personnel receive training and information to enable them to respond effectively to child safeguarding risks, concerns, disclosures and allegations of child abuse
  • 7.4 Personnel receive training and information on how to build culturally safe environments for children.

How CEDP is meeting these requirements

  • CEDP have partnered with the eSafety commissioner and developed and conducted a range of e-safety webinars for leadership, staff and parents/carers of the Diocese
  • CEDP designed, developed and implemented the Building Child Safe Communities undertaking and learning module. This program requires all volunteers and contractors of the Diocese to complete a short learning module on Safeguarding standards within CEDP prior to engagement in their role. Videos, fact sheets and OSCAR (staff Intranet) and external website page resources were developed in support of this initiative.
  • CEDP designed, developed and implemented the Safeguarding (reportable conduct) Online Training and ROSH (Risk of Significant Harm) online training. Both modules take one hour each to complete and form part of the mandatory annual training requirements for all staff in CEDP. The completion of these modules can be tracked by the development of site and CEDP specific training dashboards (analytics) and forms part of all schools audit programs.
  • SALT online mandatory training is also required for all employees at the commencement of their employment with CEDP. SALT covers complaints involving staff members and the Children's Guardian Act in addition to understanding mandatory reporting (RoSH)
  • All training requires registration via the PL portal or via SALT online. Mandatory training dashboards have been created to monitor completion at a system and local level of SALT, Reportable Conduct and ROSH online
  • Mandatory training programs in WHS also require relevant staff at schools to be training in first aid, CPR, anaphylaxis, asthma and diabetes
  • Staff have access to the Student Services course list
  • Access EAP offers 'culturally sensitive counsellors and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander counsellors' and also 'cultural competency training.'

How schools meet these requirements

In addition to the above, CEDP schools meet the Standards utilising local programs and initiatives. These may include the following:

  • Compliance audit number MR125: The school provides support for beginning teachers by ensuring Beginning Teachers and Supervising Teachers attend induction, CEDP System Professional Learning for Beginning Teachers and NESA information sessions as required. CEDP / RANGS 5.2.1
  • Compliance audit number MR106: The school must have guidelines that outline the process used by the school for outside tutors to ensure that in accessing any outside tutor, the school continues to comply with the requirements under the Child Protection (Working with Children) Act 2012. RANGS 5.2.2 MR115 MR501-MR506
  • Staff have access to the Student Services course list.

Physical and online environments promote safety and contain appropriate safeguards to minimise the opportunity for children to be harmed


Indicators

  • 8.1 Personnel identify and mitigate risks in online and physical environments without compromising a child’s right to privacy, access to information, social connections and learning opportunities
  • 8.2 The online environment is used in accordance with the entity’s Code of Conduct and safeguarding policies and procedures
  • 8.3 Risk management plans consider risks posed by the entity’s settings, activities and physical environments
  • 8.4 Entities that contract facilities and services to and from third parties have procurement policies that ensure safeguarding of children.

How CEDP is meeting these requirements

In addition to the above, CEDP schools meet the Standards utilising local programs and initiatives. These may include the following:

  • Induction and regular updates are given to staff on appropriate behaviours to encourage and to avoid when interacting and engaging with children and students
  • For safeguarding investigations, a risk management plan/process is conducted. The manager and safeguarding team undertake a risk assessment to determine whether there is a risk to the alleged victim, subject of allegation, community and/or school while the allegation is investigated
  • The annual Child Protection Facilities Audit addresses specific types of child protection risks in relation to the school's physical environment
  • Responsible use of ICT and Social Media (Students) Guidelines and Acceptable use of ICT and Social Media (Staff) Guidelines are in place
  • Video Conferencing Guidelines for Teachers and Students outlines the guidelines for safe use of technology during video conferencing. The guidelines are available for access by teachers, parents and students.
  • CEDP's Code of Conduct When Working with Children and Students
  • CEDP have an authenticated account for online programs such as Zoom. There are passwords on all zoom meetings, which also have an enforced waiting room. There are default settings in regards to video and audio and zoom organisers have greater control.
  • CEDP reports online offences to NSW Police in accordance with legislative reporting obligations
  • Specialist safeguarding support and human resources support is provided within CEDP
  • Regular reviews are conducted in regards to policies and procedures pertaining to the use of acceptable ICT
  • CM3 contractor management process are in place.

How schools meet these requirements

  • Schools are required to complete CEDP annual compliance programs including 247, WHS and Facilities audits, which include identifying and addressing physical risks to students
  • Responsible use of ICT and Social Media (Students) Guidelines and Acceptable use of ICT and Social Media (Staff) Guidelines are in place
  • Video Conferencing Guidelines for Teachers and Students outlines the guidelines for safe use of technology during video conferencing. The guidelines are available for access by teachers, parents and students.

Entities regularly review and improve implementation of their systems for keeping children safe


Indicators

  • 9.1 The entity regularly reviews and improves child safeguarding practices
  • 9.2 The entity analyses concerns and complaints to identify causes and systematic failures to inform continuous improvement
  • 9.3 The Church Authority reports on the findings of relevant reviews to personnel, children, families, carers and community.

How CEDP is meeting these requirements

  • CEDP Safeguarding has implemented and manages 'The Self Assessment Compliance Tool' as part of CEDP's implementation plan. This plan is continuously reviewed by the Safeguarding senior manager, with involvement from the Safeguarding team. Leadership receive quarterly reports and review the progress towards the implementation plan. The Safeguarding Committee also receive regularly reports via the leadership reporting mechanism. Minutes of meetings and report to leadership are available.
  • Regular reviews (every three years) of CEDP policies are conducted, with amendments during that period as the need arises
  • CEDP distributes monthly reports to the Diocesan Safeguarding Office for analysis of trends and patterns at a Diocesan level
  • The safeguarding procedures have a review date outlined on the document (which will occur prior to March 2023)
  • CEDP meets quarterly with the OCG via Catholic Schools NSW office which makes recommendations and informs direction in relation to policy and procedure development
  • CEDP has developed tableau dashboards for relevant data, including BCSC information which allows for review of relevant data and analytics to improve processes within CEDP.

How schools meet these requirements

In addition to the above, CEDP schools meet the Standards utilising local programs and initiatives. These may include the following:

Policies and procedures document how the entity is safe for children


Indicators

  • 10.1 Policies and procedures address the National Catholic Safeguarding Standards
  • 10.2 Policies and procedures are accessible and easy to understand
  • 10.3 Best practice policy models and stakeholder consultation inform the development and review of policies and procedures
  • 10.4 The Church Authority and leaders champion and model compliance with policies and procedures
  • 10.5 Personnel understand and implement the policies and procedures.

How CEDP is meeting these requirements

CEDP have a range of policies and procedures that address the National Catholic Safeguarding Standards. These policies and procedures are referenced below:

  • CEDP Code of conduct and Code of Conduct When Working with Children and Students. These documents are available for all personnel, parents/carers and the community via the public website.
  • Child Protection Facilities Guidelines - SSFRMAT accessible to staff via OSCAR the staff Intranet
  • Complaints handling processes
  • Safeguarding procedures
  • Working with Children Check Policy
  • CEDP reviews feedback provided by the OCG at the completion of each investigation and ensures any recommended changes are implemented and/or responded to
  • Annual completion of compliance programs including 247, WHS and Facilities Audits
  • Policy Central is available for all staff to access polices and procedures. Relevant policies and procedures are also available on CEDP's external website for the public.

How schools meet these requirements

  • Annual completion of compliance programs including 247, WHS and Facilities Audits.

 

 

 

 

Child Protection Links

 

eSafety Commissioner

eSafety Commissioner

Helping Australians to have safer, more positive experiences online.

NSW Family and Community Services

NSW Family and Community Services

Community Services (formerly DoCS) is the leading NSW Government agency responsible for community services.

Kids Helpline

Kids Helpline

Kids Helpline is a counselling service for Australian children and young people aged between 5 and 25 years.

National Child Safe Principles

National Child Safety Principles

The National Principles for Child Safe Organisations are an initiative of the Council of Australian Governments.

10 Child Safe Principles

10 Child Safety Principles

A poster summarising the 10 principles for child safe organisations.

National Catholic Safeguarding Standards

National Catholic Safeguarding Standards

These are designed to be implemented by all Catholic entities, ministries and organisations across Australia to drive cultural and behavioural change.

 

 

 

If you have an enquiry concerning Child Protection or the training modules please email safeguarding@parra.catholic.edu.au